Gary Meadows, a College of Pharmacy professor at WSU since 1976, has received a Senior Scientist Research and Mentorship Award from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

The five-year, $1 million grant is to provide him with more time for research and to mentor three to five junior faculty at WSU.

Between two and five such awards are granted annually by the NIAAA. Records dating back to 1972 indicate this is the first Senior Scientist award received at WSU.

Meadows’ research into the connection between nutrition and cancer and between alcohol and cancer has been continuously funded by the NIH since 1979.

Meadows’ studies with alcohol focus on its effects on the immune system, particularly on natural killer cells. Meadows is credited with the development of a low stress model for administering alcohol to mice, referred to in the field as the “Meadows Model.”

He has written more than 100 publications and mentored a number of graduate students and postdoctoral research associates.

From 1998-2001, he served as program director of an NIAAA Training Grant at WSU to prepare pre-doctoral and postdoctoral researchers to study the role of alcohol abuse on the immune system.

In addition to his research, Meadows also is the director of the Cancer Prevention and Research Center, an umbrella organization for cancer research at WSU, and he holds the Dorothy O. Kennedy Distinguished Professorship in the College.

Meadows also has been a visiting scientist and professor at the National Institutes of Health and the University of British Columbia.

Meadows is a past chairman of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, a past chair of the Pharmacology/Toxicology Graduate Program in the College of Pharmacy, and an honorary professor at the Medical College of Zhengzhou University in the People’s Republic of China.