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Student pharmacists work across disciplines to solve complex patient cases

Working with future physicians, nurses, and health care providers across disciplines is a vital part of the WSU Doctor of Pharmacy program. It prepares student pharmacists for a real world setting where they may be collaborating with providers on the best plan of action for unique patient situations. For example, how does one treat a 72-year-old patient who is recovering from prostate cancer and living with type 2 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis? » More ...

Cannabis use could cause harmful drug interactions

Using cannabis alongside other drugs may come with a significant risk of harmful drug-drug interactions, new research by scientists at Washington State University suggests. The researchers looked at cannabinoids—a group of substances found in the cannabis plant—and their major metabolites found in cannabis users’ blood and found that they interfere with two families of enzymes that help metabolize a wide range of drugs prescribed for a variety of conditions. As a result, either the drugs’ positive effects might decrease or their negative effects might increase with too much building up in the body, causing unintended side effects such as toxicity or accidental overdose. » More ...

Acquiring research experience during pharmacy school

Fourth-year pharmacy student Emily Hitt shares her experience with research during her pharmacy education. Getting involved in research can provide a competitive edge needed to secure postgraduate opportunities after pharmacy school, which is vital if you wish to pursue a career in academia or research. Research experience, presentations, and publications are valued by residency program directors and can provide a competitive edge for opportunities after pharmacy school. » More ...

December 2021 Updates

FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP

Publications

J. Roberts and Marcia Fosberg Distinguished Regents Professor of Pharmacotherapy and Director of the Drug Information Center Danial Baker published, “Drug utilization evaluation – asparaginase erwinia chrysanthemi (Recombinant) (Rylaze),” in Wolters Kluwer Health’s The Formulary Monograph Service (FMS) in October 2021. Wolters Kluwer Health is a drug and health information publisher, the FMS is a resource used in the formulary decision making process for hospitals and managed care systems on recently released and investigational drugs.

Pharmacotherapy Clinical Professor and Director of Quality Assurance Improvement & Accreditation Preparation Terri Levien and Danial Baker published, “Drug Utilization evaluation – belumosudil (Rezurock),” in the FMS in October 2021.

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Alumni Spotlight: Pharmacy Career in Oncology

Natasha Olson, class of 2014, shares her professional journey from becoming a pharmacy intern at Rite Aid to manager of clinical initiatives with NCODA (National Community Oncology Dispensing Association). Her passion for patient-centered care led her on a path to oncology pharmacy, where she now shares her experience and best practice with other clinicians. Hear her story to learn about the various opportunities from a career in pharmacy. » More ...

Driving a reproductive health campaign during a pandemic

As the COVID-19 pandemic began to spread across the country in early 2020, student pharmacists Brooke Kotlarz, Kaitlan Belocura and Kennedy Erickson worked with various stakeholders in the community to educate and empower individuals on reproductive health. They share their experience of pivoting to a virtual campaign in Washington state and discuss the vital role that pharmacists play in helping to inform local communities about reproductive health.  » More ...

Finding health care solutions for medically underserved rural areas

In the United States there are 14 million people living in medically underserved areas where access to health care continues to be a chronic problem with no clear solutions. Many residents who live in rural areas don’t have access to doctors, nurses, or pharmacists, and getting medical attention often translates to a several hours drive to the nearest city. College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (CPPS) Associate Professors of Pharmacotherapy Kimberly McKeirnan and Megan Undeberg are finding ways to bridge this health care gap.

“There is such a disparity of care for the rural sector,” said Undeberg, who also grew up on a farm … » More …

Medicine-carriers made from human cells can cure lung infections

By Sara Zaske, WSU News

SPOKANE, Wash. – Scientists used human white blood cell membranes to carry two drugs, an antibiotic and an anti-inflammatory, directly to infected lungs in mice.

The nano-sized drug delivery method developed at Washington State University successfully treated both the bacterial growth and inflammation in the mice’s lungs. The study, recently published in Communications Biology, shows a potential new strategy for treating infectious diseases, including COVID-19.

“If a doctor simply gives two drugs to a patient, they don’t go directly to the lungs. They circulate in the whole body, so potentially there’s a lot of toxicity,” said Zhenjia Wang, … » More …